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Cloud computing employment trends shift from generalists to specialists

Cloud computing has created a plethora of new jobs in the IT industry and shows no signs of slowing down. But what are companies looking for in a potential cloud employee? Job hunters face the difficult choice of zeroing in on a certain cloud service or vendor, or becoming a jack of all trades.

We asked the SearchCloudComputing Advisory Board what they consider to be the biggest cloud computing employment trends — and what employers are looking for. Here’s a look at their answers.

Alex Witherspoon

[In] the older enterprise IT model, there was a drive toward specialists [who] have a deep understanding of complex systems, like modern storage, servers and networking, to operate software. The strength in this is that one can be complexly involved with all elements of the platform. Many of those systems are still there, but in a modern cloud, those infrastructure problems and specialties are obfuscated to the end user, so a modern company can focus much more heavily on the software, the customer and the business.

This trend has led to an Agile-focused mindset — one that is much more concerned with technology as an operating cost and series of capabilities. This could be called DevOps, but it’s effectively removing the complexity of infrastructure [from] development and operation teams and turns the focus much more heavily into the software and design of software platforms, rather than infrastructure itself. Jobs will still be diverse between centralized architects and decentralized, general jack-of-all- trades, such as found in site reliability engineering teams, but they will be commonly focused on software architecture, rather than infrastructure architecture.

Gaurav “GP” Pal

Given the breadth and scope of the cloud computing marketplace and offerings, we are starting to see specializations by certain lines of services and expertise. For example, until a couple of years ago, we used to have Amazon Web Services (AWS) Solution Architects, but given the scope of services, a Solution Architect can’t cover every topic and must specialize.

We are starting to see specializations or competencies as they are referred to more commonly around DevOps, security, big data and managed services. A further sub-set of specialization is developing around specific regulated markets, specifically healthcare (HIPAA), U.S. public sector (FedRAMP), commercial (PCI) or financial services (FFIEC).

Bill Wilder

I expect specialization in cloud computing roles to evolve along with the cloud platforms. The big public cloud platform vendors are supporting common industry approaches, such as use of containers, through vendors such as Docker, and VM configuration tools, such as Chef and Puppet. While valuable in the cloud, these skills are infrastructure as a service (IaaS) focused. You can put some VMs in the cloud so that infrastructure looks and acts like our on-premises world, except with incredible convenience around scale, pay-as-you-go, great automation support and other aspects. Many of these skills are not significantly tied to any platform, cloud or not, but they are certainly important for the IaaS style of cloud usage since a high degree of automation is the norm.

But the trend is that the big public cloud platform players are driving services for easy access to databases, messaging, security, scaling, key management, backup management and on and on. The catch is that even though the services are covering a lot of the same ground, they aren’t used in the same ways, and sophisticated use of these services begins to require specialization. For example, AWS Lambda and Azure Functions both support serverless compute models, but they are part of different ecosystems and there is a learning curve for becoming an expert in that particular feature and the broader set of functionality it sits within. I expect skills for cloud platform expertise will increasingly diverge because there is so much active investment and innovation across Amazon, Microsoft and Google.

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