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      • Start modernizing customer relationship management systems today

        If you were asked to define either an on-premises or hosted contact center, could you? Don't fret if you can't: Many professionals don't know the difference between the two. Choosing between the two different systems, however, is one of the most important decisions when implementing a contact center. And new technologies, increased customer expectations and social media-based customer service are further complicating the choice.

        A move away from a legacy contact center system can alleviate pain, improve employee satisfaction and customer service, and save your company money. Confused where to begin? This three-part guide is a good start. Inside, SearchCRM writers explore the key differences between a hosted and an on-premises contact center. Former Site Editor Lena J. Weiner drills down on the pros and cons -- and specifically, the myriad responsibilities -- in an introduction to each system. Next, reporter Christine Parizo takes a hard look at the legacy systems in contact centers. With some observers today advocating a mix and match of new and old technologies to deal with customers, it's no simple task deciding which systems will remain. To close, Lauren Horwitz, SearchCRM's executive editor, points to some of the newest trends in contact center technology -- specifically, changes to contact center strategy wrought by social media-based customer service.

        View E-Handbook
      • Open Information Security Management Maturity Model (O-ISM3)

        Organizations in different business sectors and countries have different business requirements and risk tolerances. The O-ISM3 framework helps information Security Managers to evaluate their own operating environment and to plan their security management processes so they are consistent with and cost-effective for their organization’s business objectives.

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      • CW+ Open Group: The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF™ 9) and the US DoD

        This White Paper provides a comparative analysis of the two frameworks that describes where DoDAF products can be employed throughout the TOGAF ADM phases to develop a visual, integrated model of an architecture. The intended audience is the DoD architect who can benefit from a formal methodology to guide architecture efforts and result in a quality architecture description in a DoD-compliant format, and the TOGAF architect who can benefit by a formal set of defined models to capture output for each of the ADM phases. This document provides the architect with a map of the specific DoDAF 2.0 model that should be produced or consumed in a specific phase of TOGAF 9 with enough context to understand the fundamental concepts of both DoDAF and TOGAF.

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      • Open Group: FAIR -ISO/IEC 27005 Cookbook

        This document discusses the different purposes of the two standards, how to reconcile the two with regard to terminology and process, and combine the best elements of both to produce a consistent, repeatable risk management process.

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      • How to deploy and manage a hybrid cloud approach

        A hybrid cloud can be a practical approach to entering the world of cloud computing. There's a lot to consider, though, and the shift is far from simple. This handbook looks specifically at why an organization might choose to go with a hybrid model; which workloads that organization should consider appropriate for the cloud; how to assess security risks; and what challenges should be expected when implementing a hybrid cloud project.

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      • Private cloud strategy: Building blocks and roadblocks

        May 2011, Vol. 1 No. 2

        Includes:
        • Moving to a private cloud: Unveiling the myths
        • Adjusting IT attitudes toward private cloud
        • Applications interfere with cloud computing adoption
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      • Building an effective private cloud in 10 steps

        Private clouds offer many of the advantages of public cloud services, but without the security concerns and compliance issues that make IT managers sweat. So how time-intensive is it to build a private cloud in your enterprise? Roll up your sleeves; this handbook will give you the tools you need to build your own private cloud—in 10 steps or fewer.

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      • Is cloud-based storage right for your company?

        Storage needs are growing exponentially. Cloud-based storage has emerged as an alternative to on-site, traditional methods, but it may not make sense in every case. This handbook explores cloud-based storage in terms of cost, manageability, scalability, flexibility, latency/availability and more. It also looks at cloud-based backup and disaster recovery options in the cloud.

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      • The cloud: Too much (or too little) of a good thing?

        One of the major benefits of cloud services is efficiency. Without proper cloud capacity management, however, companies can miss out on that benefit. This handbook includes best practices on how to avoid provisioning too many or too few resources; it also provides guidance on how to address cost concerns with respect to cloud capacity.

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      • In cloud planning, make room for storage

        This handbook explores cloud-based storage in terms of cost, manageability, scalability, flexibility, latency/availability and more. It also looks at cloud-based backup and disaster recovery options in the cloud.

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      • Is it time to migrate to the cloud?

        Cloud computing offers substantial benefits for some companies in terms of scalability, flexibility and cost savings through shared, multitenant infrastructure. But for some companies with lots of sensitive data subject to regulation, entrenched data center investments and lots of legacy architecture, moving to the cloud may not make sense. On the other end of the spectrum, smaller companies without a lot of data center resources may benefit from access to the cloud or may not get cost benefits from a private or hybrid cloud if they haven't virtualized enough on their own.

        In this handbook on considerations in moving to the cloud, we evaluate the kinds of company and infrastructure conditions in which it does -- or doesn't -- make sense to move to one of the cloud models.

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      • Getting over the cloud adoption hurdle

        This handbook offers insight into some of the most prominent issues that organizations face with cloud computing -- privacy, security, data governance and compliance. We'll also outline criteria that cloud managers should keep in mind when researching cloud security, as well as management tools to help manage data and resources within a cloud infrastructure. IT teams want to get on board with cloud, but they're faced with security and compliance concerns that can complicate adoption. They need guidance on how to move to the cloud more easily.

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      • Cloud computing security up close

        The cloud can't guarantee absolute data security, so you have to take safety into your own hands. This IT handbook is designed to help organizations make practical and strategic decisions about their own cloud computing security. Follow these guidelines to make sure that you've established policies that define data classification categories, data labeling mechanisms and data handling requirements.

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      • Migrating applications to the cloud

        Putting the cloud to work can mean migrating existing applications into the cloud, a process that requires careful planning and evaluation. This handbook considers best practices for the migration of applications to be sure that an organization can take advantage of the benefits of the cloud without undermining server and application performance. What are the best ways to determine which applications can and should make the move? How should applications be prepared for migration? And what are the security and hardware considerations involved in taking applications designed to run on-premises and putting them in the cloud? This discussion also will address legacy apps and when it might make sense to rebuild or replace such highly customized applications rather than move them.

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      • Migrating internal apps to the cloud

        Follow this step-by-step guide from concept to implementation to ensure your move to the cloud is efficient and valuable for your organization. If you're migrating internal apps to the cloud, this e-book will provide a roadmap for success.

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      • Designing an application migration plan to bring internal apps to the cloud

        There are benefits to moving to the cloud, but it can be a thorny process for organizations that don’t take the time to prepare. If you're looking for help designing an application migration plan, follow this step-by-step approach and you'll have an effective plan to take your organization from concept to implementation. Follow our tips to ensure that your cloud-computing roadmap leads to success.

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      • Hosting applications in the cloud and cloud services explained

        Whether it's public cloud, private cloud or a hybrid of the two, IT can be delivered as a service to today's businesses faster, cheaper and more efficiently than ever before. Today, nearly every company is considering at least some form of “as-a-service” deployment of software tools, and there is no question that there can be significant benefits. But when adopting as-a-service technology for your own company, you must maximize your benefits and manage your risks. Read this E-Book to learn more about hosting applications in the cloud and cloud services.

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      • The promise and perils of open source clouds

        As cloud computing has developed, open source software has become a cornerstone of the model, which emphasizes homogeneity among infrastructure resources.

        But just as open source has its share of advantages for cloud projects, it also has its downsides. The idea of a license-free or lower-cost option can be enticing to budget-conscious IT departments, but the do-it-yourself nature of open source can be a major disadvantage for some shops. And just because a tool or platform is open source does not ensure integration and portability between cloud environments and so on. So too, many proprietary options offer the advantages of open source because they are built on open source code, but they lack some of its liabilities in terms of lack of support or problems with ease of use. In this handbook on open source and the cloud, we look at open source options, the benefits and liabilities, as well as the pros and cons of proprietary models.

        We explore some of the key issues shaping the market, the tools available and how data centers make use of and contend with open source issues.

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      • Open source in the cloud: Boon or bust?

        November 2011, Vol. 1 No. 4

        Includes:
        • No democracy for apps in the cloud?
        • Trends in cloud computing
        • Top cloud computing trends in the enterprise
        View E-Zine
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Featured E-ZINES on searchCloudComputing.comView all >>

  • Modern Infrastructure

    Modern Infrastructure covers the convergence of technologies -- from cloud computing to virtualization to mobile devices -- and the impact on data centers.

  • Private Cloud

    The Private Cloud Computing E-Zine cuts through the hype and industry-slant to help IT pros leverage cloud computing as a solution to on-going pricing, protection, archiving, e-discovery, bandwidth, and performance issues in the data center.

ALL TECHTARGET E-ZINES

Featured E-BOOKS on searchCloudComputing.comView all >>

  • Forging the path to tomorrow's CRM

    Perhaps no two words have more of an effect on business today than "customer experience." Consumers have a wealth of options for buying products and services -- and they're not shy about letting the social media sphere know when they’re not happy. To keep them coming -- and coming back -- organizations need to ensure that the experiences they’re serving up are nothing less than stellar.

    In our e-book series, The Risks and Rewards of Customer Experience Management, readers will get practical advice and real-world insight into strategies that place the focus of organizations' operations and processes on their customers. The first chapter concentrates on automation in the contact center. It will explore the technologies, such as interactive voice response and virtual agents. And it will examine what organizations need to evaluate when deciding which processes to automate and which areas will always need a human touch. The second installment delves into digital marketing, mobile applications and social media. It's no longer enough to send the same message to all customers; messages now must be personalized -- and soon, based on where customers are at any given moment. The chapter will look at location-based automated marketing and the pros and cons -- including the loss of privacy -- associated with such practices. The final chapter digs deep into the role of analytics in customer experience management plans, scrutinizing data harvesting methods and ways to use big data to augment customer experiences. And the chapter will look at times when knowing all about your customer goes horribly wrong.

  • Market trends tell the future of predictive analytics deployments

    Predictive analytics employs statistical or machine-learning models to discover patterns and relationships in data, thereby enabling the prediction of future behavior or activity. Long used by credit card companies, predictive analytics -- and now self-service predictive analytics -- is making inroads in organizations of all sizes. Based on a survey of more than 3,000 IT and business professionals, this report analyzes their responses to provide information on implementation status, maturity of implementations, value and vendors of predictive analytics tools.

OTHER FEATURED E-BOOKS

Featured E-HANDBOOKS on searchCloudComputing.comView all >>

  • Start modernizing customer relationship management systems today

    If you were asked to define either an on-premises or hosted contact center, could you? Don't fret if you can't: Many professionals don't know the difference between the two. Choosing between the two different systems, however, is one of the most important decisions when implementing a contact center. And new technologies, increased customer expectations and social media-based customer service are further complicating the choice.

    A move away from a legacy contact center system can alleviate pain, improve employee satisfaction and customer service, and save your company money. Confused where to begin? This three-part guide is a good start. Inside, SearchCRM writers explore the key differences between a hosted and an on-premises contact center. Former Site Editor Lena J. Weiner drills down on the pros and cons -- and specifically, the myriad responsibilities -- in an introduction to each system. Next, reporter Christine Parizo takes a hard look at the legacy systems in contact centers. With some observers today advocating a mix and match of new and old technologies to deal with customers, it's no simple task deciding which systems will remain. To close, Lauren Horwitz, SearchCRM's executive editor, points to some of the newest trends in contact center technology -- specifically, changes to contact center strategy wrought by social media-based customer service.

  • Open Information Security Management Maturity Model (O-ISM3)

    Organizations in different business sectors and countries have different business requirements and risk tolerances. The O-ISM3 framework helps information Security Managers to evaluate their own operating environment and to plan their security management processes so they are consistent with and cost-effective for their organization’s business objectives.

OTHER FEATURED E-HANDBOOKS