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      • Determine if NoSQL databases are right for your organization

        NoSQL databases offer more flexible alternatives to mainstream relational software, particularly for big data applications. But NoSQL offerings include a diverse set of technologies that can present prospective users with a bewildering array of choices. And those technologies have yet to secure a place in many organizations. In fact, in a survey of IT and business professionals conducted by The Data Warehousing Institute in November 2013, 65% of the respondents said they had no plans to incorporate NoSQL databases into their data warehouse architectures. Don't let that scare you off, though: There are companies successfully putting NoSQL products to work in applications they're suited for.

        In this three-part guide, readers will learn about the different types of NoSQL technologies and their potential uses. First, get details about the four primary NoSQL product categories, with deployment examples from experienced users and advice on how to avoid going down the wrong database path. Next, read about why it's a mistake to force-fit technologies into IT environments -- and why Gartner analyst Merv Adrian says it's a fruitless exercise to compare NoSQL offerings "that are so wildly different in structure and intent." And in our third story, find out why many organizations are creating what consultancy Enterprise Management Associates calls a hybrid data ecosystem -- a blend of old and new technologies, including NoSQL systems -- to support their big data environments.

        View E-Handbook
      • Staying secure, HIPAA compliant with mobile technologies

        The integration of health data systems with phones, tablets, laptops and other mobile devices is one of the biggest challenges facing healthcare IT professionals. That, readers will soon learn, is easier said than done.

        In this three-part guide, we clear away some of the cobweb-ridden concerns around mobile device management. First, readers will take a look at the repercussions of recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration draft guidance. While makers of new mobile personal health apps are rejoicing over news that the FDA will not regulate mobile device data systems (MDDS), it's a potential nightmare for healthcare providers. Experts say the move leaves medical devices with an extremely low barrier for safety -- and no checks and balances to speak of.

        Next, we attempt to understand why -- even with the technology to support it -- adoption of mHealth apps is so low. To that end, health IT consultant Reda Chouffani points to areas where mobile healthcare could serve to enhance the care experience. We close with a look at patient engagement, as mandated in stage 2 meaningful use criteria. Many in healthcare are looking to technology -- electronic communication, primarily -- to involve patients in their care, and the pressure to effectively address patient engagement safety is mounting. Here, we outline the steps hospitals everywhere must take to do just that.

        View E-Handbook
      • Compare business needs with the ERP choices available

        The risks of picking a bad ERP system or implementing it poorly are as significant as the opportunities for efficiency, collaboration and innovation that can come from finding the perfect system. And with today's ERP market boasting more choices than ever before, organizations don't have it easy.

        In this three-part guide, the ERP experts at Panorama Consulting Solutions tell readers how to choose wisely. They start simply: Keep your eyes open. Often, organizations fall victim to the marketing and publicity around larger vendors -- neglecting to explore smaller companies that, in Panorama's experience, are often a better fit. Next, they take a look at Software as a Service ERP systems. Compared with traditional, on-premises systems, software functionality delivered via the Internet -- as in SaaS and open source systems -- is an exciting trend in the ERP market. But while it might appeal to companies as a lower-cost alternative, there are some big risks involved. To close, they detail the seven factors they say are critical to any successful ERP implementation -- including whether your organization needs an ERP system at all.

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      • ACOs justify telemedicine investment

        July/August 2014

        Includes:
        • How can IT avoid the security threats attacking mobile health devices?
        • Can you see me now? More providers make telemedicine investments
        • Security is top focus in outsourced healthcare identity management
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      • How to deploy and manage a hybrid cloud approach

        A hybrid cloud can be a practical approach to entering the world of cloud computing. There's a lot to consider, though, and the shift is far from simple. This handbook looks specifically at why an organization might choose to go with a hybrid model; which workloads that organization should consider appropriate for the cloud; how to assess security risks; and what challenges should be expected when implementing a hybrid cloud project.

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      • Private cloud strategy: Building blocks and roadblocks

        May 2011, Vol. 1 No. 2

        Includes:
        • Moving to a private cloud: Unveiling the myths
        • Adjusting IT attitudes toward private cloud
        • Applications interfere with cloud computing adoption
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      • Building an effective private cloud in 10 steps

        Private clouds offer many of the advantages of public cloud services, but without the security concerns and compliance issues that make IT managers sweat. So how time-intensive is it to build a private cloud in your enterprise? Roll up your sleeves; this handbook will give you the tools you need to build your own private cloud—in 10 steps or fewer.

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      • Is cloud-based storage right for your company?

        Storage needs are growing exponentially. Cloud-based storage has emerged as an alternative to on-site, traditional methods, but it may not make sense in every case. This handbook explores cloud-based storage in terms of cost, manageability, scalability, flexibility, latency/availability and more. It also looks at cloud-based backup and disaster recovery options in the cloud.

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      • The cloud: Too much (or too little) of a good thing?

        One of the major benefits of cloud services is efficiency. Without proper cloud capacity management, however, companies can miss out on that benefit. This handbook includes best practices on how to avoid provisioning too many or too few resources; it also provides guidance on how to address cost concerns with respect to cloud capacity.

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      • In cloud planning, make room for storage

        This handbook explores cloud-based storage in terms of cost, manageability, scalability, flexibility, latency/availability and more. It also looks at cloud-based backup and disaster recovery options in the cloud.

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      • Is it time to migrate to the cloud?

        Cloud computing offers substantial benefits for some companies in terms of scalability, flexibility and cost savings through shared, multitenant infrastructure. But for some companies with lots of sensitive data subject to regulation, entrenched data center investments and lots of legacy architecture, moving to the cloud may not make sense. On the other end of the spectrum, smaller companies without a lot of data center resources may benefit from access to the cloud or may not get cost benefits from a private or hybrid cloud if they haven't virtualized enough on their own.

        In this handbook on considerations in moving to the cloud, we evaluate the kinds of company and infrastructure conditions in which it does -- or doesn't -- make sense to move to one of the cloud models.

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      • Getting over the cloud adoption hurdle

        This handbook offers insight into some of the most prominent issues that organizations face with cloud computing -- privacy, security, data governance and compliance. We'll also outline criteria that cloud managers should keep in mind when researching cloud security, as well as management tools to help manage data and resources within a cloud infrastructure. IT teams want to get on board with cloud, but they're faced with security and compliance concerns that can complicate adoption. They need guidance on how to move to the cloud more easily.

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      • Cloud computing security up close

        The cloud can't guarantee absolute data security, so you have to take safety into your own hands. This IT handbook is designed to help organizations make practical and strategic decisions about their own cloud computing security. Follow these guidelines to make sure that you've established policies that define data classification categories, data labeling mechanisms and data handling requirements.

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      • Migrating applications to the cloud

        Putting the cloud to work can mean migrating existing applications into the cloud, a process that requires careful planning and evaluation. This handbook considers best practices for the migration of applications to be sure that an organization can take advantage of the benefits of the cloud without undermining server and application performance. What are the best ways to determine which applications can and should make the move? How should applications be prepared for migration? And what are the security and hardware considerations involved in taking applications designed to run on-premises and putting them in the cloud? This discussion also will address legacy apps and when it might make sense to rebuild or replace such highly customized applications rather than move them.

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      • Migrating internal apps to the cloud

        Follow this step-by-step guide from concept to implementation to ensure your move to the cloud is efficient and valuable for your organization. If you're migrating internal apps to the cloud, this e-book will provide a roadmap for success.

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      • Designing an application migration plan to bring internal apps to the cloud

        There are benefits to moving to the cloud, but it can be a thorny process for organizations that don’t take the time to prepare. If you're looking for help designing an application migration plan, follow this step-by-step approach and you'll have an effective plan to take your organization from concept to implementation. Follow our tips to ensure that your cloud-computing roadmap leads to success.

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      • Hosting applications in the cloud and cloud services explained

        Whether it's public cloud, private cloud or a hybrid of the two, IT can be delivered as a service to today's businesses faster, cheaper and more efficiently than ever before. Today, nearly every company is considering at least some form of “as-a-service” deployment of software tools, and there is no question that there can be significant benefits. But when adopting as-a-service technology for your own company, you must maximize your benefits and manage your risks. Read this E-Book to learn more about hosting applications in the cloud and cloud services.

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      • The promise and perils of open source clouds

        As cloud computing has developed, open source software has become a cornerstone of the model, which emphasizes homogeneity among infrastructure resources.

        But just as open source has its share of advantages for cloud projects, it also has its downsides. The idea of a license-free or lower-cost option can be enticing to budget-conscious IT departments, but the do-it-yourself nature of open source can be a major disadvantage for some shops. And just because a tool or platform is open source does not ensure integration and portability between cloud environments and so on. So too, many proprietary options offer the advantages of open source because they are built on open source code, but they lack some of its liabilities in terms of lack of support or problems with ease of use. In this handbook on open source and the cloud, we look at open source options, the benefits and liabilities, as well as the pros and cons of proprietary models.

        We explore some of the key issues shaping the market, the tools available and how data centers make use of and contend with open source issues.

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      • Open source in the cloud: Boon or bust?

        November 2011, Vol. 1 No. 4

        Includes:
        • No democracy for apps in the cloud?
        • Trends in cloud computing
        • Top cloud computing trends in the enterprise
        View E-Zine
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Featured E-ZINES on searchCloudComputing.comView all >>

  • Modern Infrastructure

    Modern Infrastructure covers the convergence of technologies -- from cloud computing to virtualization to mobile devices -- and the impact on data centers.

  • Private Cloud

    The Private Cloud Computing E-Zine cuts through the hype and industry-slant to help IT pros leverage cloud computing as a solution to on-going pricing, protection, archiving, e-discovery, bandwidth, and performance issues in the data center.

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  • Forging the path to tomorrow's CRM

    Perhaps no two words have more of an effect on business today than "customer experience." Consumers have a wealth of options for buying products and services -- and they're not shy about letting the social media sphere know when they’re not happy. To keep them coming -- and coming back -- organizations need to ensure that the experiences they’re serving up are nothing less than stellar.

    In our e-book series, The Risks and Rewards of Customer Experience Management, readers will get practical advice and real-world insight into strategies that place the focus of organizations' operations and processes on their customers. The first chapter concentrates on automation in the contact center. It will explore the technologies, such as interactive voice response and virtual agents. And it will examine what organizations need to evaluate when deciding which processes to automate and which areas will always need a human touch. The second installment delves into digital marketing, mobile applications and social media. It's no longer enough to send the same message to all customers; messages now must be personalized -- and soon, based on where customers are at any given moment. The chapter will look at location-based automated marketing and the pros and cons -- including the loss of privacy -- associated with such practices. The final chapter digs deep into the role of analytics in customer experience management plans, scrutinizing data harvesting methods and ways to use big data to augment customer experiences. And the chapter will look at times when knowing all about your customer goes horribly wrong.

  • Market trends tell the future of predictive analytics deployments

    Predictive analytics employs statistical or machine-learning models to discover patterns and relationships in data, thereby enabling the prediction of future behavior or activity. Long used by credit card companies, predictive analytics -- and now self-service predictive analytics -- is making inroads in organizations of all sizes. Based on a survey of more than 3,000 IT and business professionals, this report analyzes their responses to provide information on implementation status, maturity of implementations, value and vendors of predictive analytics tools.

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  • Determine if NoSQL databases are right for your organization

    NoSQL databases offer more flexible alternatives to mainstream relational software, particularly for big data applications. But NoSQL offerings include a diverse set of technologies that can present prospective users with a bewildering array of choices. And those technologies have yet to secure a place in many organizations. In fact, in a survey of IT and business professionals conducted by The Data Warehousing Institute in November 2013, 65% of the respondents said they had no plans to incorporate NoSQL databases into their data warehouse architectures. Don't let that scare you off, though: There are companies successfully putting NoSQL products to work in applications they're suited for.

    In this three-part guide, readers will learn about the different types of NoSQL technologies and their potential uses. First, get details about the four primary NoSQL product categories, with deployment examples from experienced users and advice on how to avoid going down the wrong database path. Next, read about why it's a mistake to force-fit technologies into IT environments -- and why Gartner analyst Merv Adrian says it's a fruitless exercise to compare NoSQL offerings "that are so wildly different in structure and intent." And in our third story, find out why many organizations are creating what consultancy Enterprise Management Associates calls a hybrid data ecosystem -- a blend of old and new technologies, including NoSQL systems -- to support their big data environments.

  • Staying secure, HIPAA compliant with mobile technologies

    The integration of health data systems with phones, tablets, laptops and other mobile devices is one of the biggest challenges facing healthcare IT professionals. That, readers will soon learn, is easier said than done.

    In this three-part guide, we clear away some of the cobweb-ridden concerns around mobile device management. First, readers will take a look at the repercussions of recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration draft guidance. While makers of new mobile personal health apps are rejoicing over news that the FDA will not regulate mobile device data systems (MDDS), it's a potential nightmare for healthcare providers. Experts say the move leaves medical devices with an extremely low barrier for safety -- and no checks and balances to speak of.

    Next, we attempt to understand why -- even with the technology to support it -- adoption of mHealth apps is so low. To that end, health IT consultant Reda Chouffani points to areas where mobile healthcare could serve to enhance the care experience. We close with a look at patient engagement, as mandated in stage 2 meaningful use criteria. Many in healthcare are looking to technology -- electronic communication, primarily -- to involve patients in their care, and the pressure to effectively address patient engagement safety is mounting. Here, we outline the steps hospitals everywhere must take to do just that.

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