Premium Content

Access "Cloud propels HPC sector"

Published: 01 Feb 2013

The HPC sector is showing enterprise IT what the public cloud can do: save gobs and gobs of money, while pushing the envelope on the scale of computation. But how likely is widespread adoption? For a glimpse of the future of computing, the high-performance computing sector has always been a good place to look. In this age of cloud computing, HPC shops have been true to form, seizing upon cheap and plentiful public cloud resources to build ginormous compute clusters for short dollars -- and big results. In recent years, the worldwide HPC sector has been one of the lone bright spots in IT spending, estimated at $20.3 billion in 2011, and growing at a compound annual growth rate of 7.6%, according to IDC. The availability of cheap cloud resources could propel the HPC sector still further, providing compute resources to a whole new class of users who were previously priced out, said Jason Stowe, CEO of Cycle Computing, a provider of HPC provisioning software. "Public cloud is democratizing access to utility supercomputing," Stowe said. "Before it was a have [or]... Access >>>

Access TechTarget
Premium Content for Free.

By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

What's Inside

Features

More Premium Content Accessible For Free

  • For savings, IT must recharge its approach to power usage
    recharge_approach_power_usage.png
    E-Handbook

    Power consumption accounts for a large portion of data center operating costs, so it's important to understand power usage and efficiency when ...

  • Production workloads go boldly to the cloud
    MI_0414.png
    E-Zine

    Some enterprises are charging ahead with a cloud-first approach to their workloads -- not just test and dev, but production workloads as well. That ...

  • For DR, cloud is the great equalizer
    MI_0314.png
    E-Zine

    Disaster recovery is hard and expensive, based on the many enterprises with partial -- or no -- DR plans. But cloud computing is bringing DR to the ...