Public cloud use rises, while OpenStack takes private cloud market

Public cloud has taken off like a rocket, with AWS leading, according to a report. Dave Linthicum and his guest discuss this and Canonical news.

In terms of public cloud use, it seems to be Amazon, Amazon, Amazon. A study by software as a service provider RightScale showed that hybrid cloud computing is on the rise, with Amazon Web Services taking a major lead on the public cloud side. In the private cloud market, results show OpenStack gunning for the top.

Dave Linthicum and his guest Casey Benko, president and CEO of BLT Global Ventures LLC, run through these RightScale survey results, taking some of the data with a grain of salt. And as it seems to Casey, this news of the proliferation of public cloud is neither surprising nor obvious.

"It's happy news," Benko said.

Dave and Casey also discuss what the survey says about DevOps and the unfortunate news from Canonical. Details include:

1. Hybrid cloud is where it's at, according the State of the Cloud report by RightScale. AWS is typically on the public side brand of choice -- a surprise to no one -- but OpenStack is gaining steam on the private side. Public cloud is taking off like a rocket, with customers typically deploying in a hybrid or multi-cloud architecture. Does Amazon have anything to worry about? Someone must be scaring AWS, says Casey, because of their April 1 price reductions. But are enterprises and the government really price-sensitive?

On the private cloud side, VMware seems to hold the lead, with OpenStack catching up -- but it's not that clear-cut. In small businesses, OpenStack is far ahead of VMware. If we're moving to OpenStack on the private side, why aren't we using it on the public side? Is there any bad news in this study?

2. Another major trend RightScale sees is "self-service IT," or the automation of DevOps. Where is DevOps going? What companies should be looking to DevOps? Is Chef or Puppet taking the lead in organizations?

3. Canonical is shutting down its cloud storage service rather than competing against EMC and Dropbox. If customers don't migrate off the service, customer data will be deleted. This is similar to the Nirvanix news last year, so how much should potential customers be worried? How much effort is it to move from one storage service to another? Should customers stick to larger providers, such as Amazon Web Services, for cloud storage?

This was first published in April 2014

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